Amazon.com Widgets Flotsam and Jetsam #49

Flotsam and Jetsam #49

By Nick at November 09, 2011 04:46
Filed Under: Software Development, Flotsam and Jetsam, Delphi
  • Hallvard Vassbotn has been sighted in the wild! Hallvard is an amazing developer and a great writer, and I’m delighted at the prospect of him starting to blog again, especially given his propensity to stretch Delphi language and RTL features to the limit.  Given all the new things that have happened in these areas since Hallvard’s last blog  post, one can only hope for really interesting stuff.
  • Fun to see people taking up the Dependency Inject mantle – here’s an article by Yanniel Alvarez Alfonso on a simple example of DI using DelphiDean Hill has a very good article about Software Flexibility that discusses how Dependency Injection can make your software more flexible and adaptable.   If my efforts have sparked an interest in Dependency Injection, I couldn’t be happier.  I’ll say it again:  If you aren’t using even the most basic form of Dependency Injection, then you are doing it wrong.
  • ninite.com is a really cool site that provides a valuable and helpful service.  It allows you to create a single install for a pretty broad and selectable collection of popular software.  This is particularly useful when setting up a new machine.  There’s always a million of these things that you want to install – Skype, Chrome, Firefox, your favorite IM client, media players, various utilities, etc. --  and Ninite.com allows you to select all of these and get a single installer for them all.  It does all the “smart” things that you want it to like get the 64-bit version if possible, ensures you have the latest versions -- and best of all -- it clicks all the “Next” buttons so you don’t have to.  Sweet.
  • I tweeted this notion this week -- “Crazy Idea of the Day: Every class that raises an exception unique to itself should have it's own exception type to raise. “ – and I thought that I’d expand a bit on it here.  One of my pet peeves is unclear error messages.  Somewhat of a corollary to that is the irritated feeling you get when an exception is raised, but you can’t tell right away where it came from. Thus was born the notion above – that if your class is raising an exception unique to itself (i.e., not something “normal” like EConvertError or EFileNotFoundException or something like that….) it should be raising an exception type defined specifically for the class itself.  This way, you can put a very descriptive error message in the exception, and the developer or user seeing the exception can know exactly where it came from. In addition, it allows anyone using  your class to easily trap exceptions specific to your classes.  I’ve been doing this for years, but have never seen anyone in the Delphi community really discuss it.
  • Every once and a while, I like to remind folks that they can go to the Delphi UserVoice page and vote for their favorite new features in Delphi.  This is totally unofficial, but it is interesting.  I’m still an admin there, so it’s always fun to mark items done as they get shipped. (I confess that it is also fun to close and/or reject requests that are……. not well thought out…?)  Currently, this item – “Better GUI separation and abstraction” -- is the top voted thing on the whole site, and I’m wondering if that really is indeed what the Delphi community wants the most.  In any event, you can certainly go there and vote and perhaps influence the future of the product. 
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